Book Review: Drive - by Daniel Pink

Summary

Good study of motivation for work, quite useful if you’re a manager, or teacher. Talks about extrinsic vs intrinsic rewards.

My notes

If money is used as an external reward for some activity, people lose intrinsic interest for the activity.

Rewards can deliver a short-term boost

People tend to seek out novelty and challenges, to extend and exercise their capacities, to explore, and to learn.

People are much more likely to report having “optimal experiences” at work than during leisure.

Salary etc. are “baseline rewards.” If someone’s baseline rewards aren’t enough, little motivation.

“Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do. Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.”

Contingent rewards - if you do this, then you’ll get that - negative effect. “If-then” rewards require people to forfeit some of their autonomy.

Rewards, by their very nature, narrow our focus. That’s helpful when there’s a clear path to a solution. They help us stare ahead and race faster.

Goals that people set for themselves and that are devoted to attaining mastery are good. Goals imposed by others can have side effects. Goals narrow our focus.

Offering a reward signals that the task is undesirable.

Any extrinsic reward should be unexpected and offered only after the task is complete.

We have three innate psychological needs - competence, autonomy, and relatedness.

Resist the temptation to control people - and instead do everything we can to reawaken their sense of autonomy.

A sense of autonomy has a powerful effect on individual performance and attitude.

People working in self-organized teams are more satisfied than those working in inherited teams.

People want to be accountable - and that making sure they have control over their task, their time, their technique.

Give ourselves our own performance reviews.

The most important aspect of any compensation package is fairness.

People at all levels stop doing any activity that is a waste of their time, the customer’s time, or their company’s time.